Utilizing CBT Therapy for Panic Attacks

cbt-therapist-for-panic-attackes-new-york-nyc-brooklyn-best-01Could you benefit from CBT therapy for panic attacks? Anxiety is an emotion that we all need as human beings. A healthy amount of anxiety is necessary in order to motivate and protect ourselves. However, sometimes our anxiety passes a point where it is no longer helpful. For example, it may become excessive worry, make us freeze up in social situations, lead us to engage in compulsive behavior, obsess over fears, or become panic attacks.

What are Panic Attacks

Panic attacks are sudden episodes of intense fear that include, but are not limited to physical symptoms such as a racing heartbeat, sweating, shaking, feelings of breathlessness, nausea, stomach upset, crying, and dissociating from one’s body. So what causes them? One major cause of panic is a buildup of emotion. When someone’s main coping mechanism is to avoid feelings, it can often lead to panic attacks.

Try to think about it with this analogy. Imagine filling up a mug with delicious hot coffee. The coffee is hot, so you wait for it to cool down. Then you take small sips and savor each one. When you’ve finished, you take the cup to the sink, wash it, dry it, and place it in the cabinet until tomorrow. Sounds pretty standard, right? Now imagine you were the coffee cup. The hot coffee is the intense emotion, waiting for it to cool and drinking the coffee slowly is the process of emotional regulation, washing the mug is an act of self-care, and having it in the cabinet is rest.

Anxiety

anxiety-panic-attack-info-top-nyc-brooklyn-psychotherapists-02In order to manage anxiety we have to regulate emotions on a daily basis in a healthy way, just like the coffee routine described above. Otherwise, we will become overloaded and possibly panic — just like if you kept pouring hot coffee in the mug and let it overflow everywhere. We must learn tools to slow down our thinking, get in tune with our emotions, and take care of ourselves effectively. Remember, a cup can only hold so much.

Anyone can have a panic attack at any point in their life. They’re quite common and can feel scary, especially if you’ve never had one before. So what do you do if you have a panic attack or experience chronic panic? We’re big supporters of utilizing all inclusive supports. Educate yourself on panic, get a physical exam to rule out health concerns, meet with a psychiatrist to assess for any medication needs, enlist the support of love ones, and meet with a CBT for panic attacks Therapist.

So what is a CBT therapist?

CBT or cognitive behavioral therapy is a type of therapy that is effective in treating panic attacks. CBT teaches clients how to build self-awareness and insight into their thought patterns and reframe thoughts and beliefs that interfere with healthy emotional regulation and relationships. Insight is power, and changing your self talk will be your best tool for managing anxiety. After all, panic attacks are accompanied by negative automatic thoughts. Therefore, learning to effectively use different thoughts is a great strategy to be able to de-escalate symptoms.

Learn CBT Skills

cognitive-behavioral-therapy-panic-attacks-specialists-03One example of a CBT skill is using a thought record. Your therapist can help you identify your triggers for panic, the emotions that arise during panic, negative automatic thought patterns, ways to categorize these patterns, evidence for the thoughts being both true and untrue, and alternative thoughts to practice soothing the anxiety. A thought record is just one example of an exercise you can do with a CBT therapist in order to learn concrete strategies to manage anxiety and panic.

Chances are that if you are open willing to learn new coping skills, you can minimize your panic and anxiety symptoms and start to feel more confident in your ability to manage emotions.

For more information about the psychotherapy modalities we use visit our main website: www.CobbPsychotherapy.com/approaches

To schedule an appointment:

Call: (718) 260-6462

Contact Page: www.CobbPsychotherapy.com/contact

 

Leave a reply