A modern
approach to
therapy

Welcome to Cobb Psychotherapy LCSW

We believe that therapy can benefit everyone and our dynamic team of therapists work with you to take ownership of your life and your therapy. You’re in the driver’s seat and we’re honored to be along for the ride as a guide and support. We work with you to address your challenges and build on your existing strengths to overcome them. It doesn’t matter what your challenge is called, it’s about finding the solution that works for you.


From Our Founder

We believe that there is no one-size-fits-all approach, and we offer individual, couples, group, and online therapy.

elizabeth-cobb-psychotherapy-services-sig

 

 

 

 

 


Meet the Team

Our team of 35+ licensed therapists are here to make sure you get the consultation quickly and the appointment you need fast.

 

MEET THE TEAM

 

 


Psychotherapy Services

Our Psychotherapists specialize in a variety of issues, including:

Our Locations

We provide psychotherapy services in the following convenient Manhattan and Brooklyn locations:

Call us at
718.260.6462

to schedule a complimentary phone consult or to set up your initial appointment. Or fill out our contact form and we will get in touch with you,

Contact Form

Therapy To Make Life Changes

therapist-best-nyc-brooklyn-for-planning-life-improvement-01There’s no doubt about it—change is difficult. Therapy is a great place to find support and success in making changes and achieving your goals. So why is therapy so helpful?

Collaboration and Support

Therapy is collaborative. You and your therapist work as a team to clarify and define your goals, come up with a plan of action, and identify both supports and obstacles to attaining your goals. Throughout the process, your therapist will be there to hold you accountable and to support you in problem-solving and learning from setbacks as they occur.

Effective Goal-Setting

psychotherapist-counseler-for-goal-setting-planning-new-york-02In addition to your therapist providing support and accountability, they can also help you to set goals in an effective way.  In order to make successful changes, we have to make sure that we are setting goals that are realistic. One strategy for coming up with goals is to use the SMART acronym. Below outlines the process of creating a SMART goal using the goal of increasing meditation as an example.

Specific:
Avoiding setting a goal that is too general. We are less likely to feel successful if our goal is too broad and the specifics of  who, what, where, and when aren’t answered.  For example, “My goal is to meditate more” is too broad and is setting us up for failure for a number of reasons.  So it’s important to answer some clarifying questions to help put us on the path for success:

  • Who is involved with this goal? I am involved and responsible for making time for meditation.
  • What exactly do I want to accomplish? I want to meditate three times a week.
  • Where can I accomplish my goal? I am most likely to meditate at home on my couch.
  • When can I accomplish my goal? I am usually exhausted after work, so I will meditate in the morning.

Measurable:
Set parameters so you are able to track progress and identify when you’ve achieved your goal. In addition to setting parameters, determine how you can track your progress.  Will you use an app on your phone? Your calendar?

Example: My goal is to meditate three times a week and I will mark the days in my planner. 

Attainable
While goals always include an element of challenge, we also want to make sure that it’s realistic. We don’t want to set a goal that is setting ourselves up for failure. Be realistic.

Example: Instead of “I am going to meditate every day for 30 minutes,” adjust it to something more realistic such as, “I am going to meditate three times a week for ten minutes.”  

Relevant
Make sure that your goal is consistent with more long term goals and values. This will impact your motivation and your ability to be successful.

Example: Setting a goal related to meditation supports my longer-term goals of practicing regular self-care and stress management techniques. 

Time-bound:
Set a time-frame with your goal. If we don’t have any urgency it’s hard to build up the motivation. It also gives the opportunity to evaluate. Set a time limit and then you can spend the time to reflect on the obstacles that got in your way and the supports that helped you to be successful.

Example: “I am going to meditate three times a week for one month.”

top-new-york-therapists-goal-setting-life-planning-03So, if we think about all of the above criteria, an effective SMART goal maybe: “My goal is to meditate three times a week (Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays) in the morning after breakfast for one month. I will keep track of my progress by making a check mark on my calendar.”

Creating SMART goals is one of many techniques that you can learn and practice with a therapist. While the decision to start therapy can be intimidating, it can support you on the path to make meaningful change. Call us today and start creating meaningful positive change in your life.

4 convenient locations in Manhattan and Brooklyn. Call today:

(718) 260-6462

Overcoming Obstacles to Reaching Your Goals

psychotherapist-for-motivation-nyc-brooklyn-01Have you ever considered psychotherapy for motivation? Attaining the goals that we set for ourselves is no easy feat. Whether it is to create a regular fitness routine, learn a new skill, or set aside time for self-care, it takes hard work to stay motivated and consistent with our plans. However, there are easy fixes you can make to build your motivation, overcome resistance, and stick with your goals. These can be done on your own or with the support of a therapist.

Remove Practical Barriers

Many clients don’t achieve their goals because of practical barriers. For example, take the goal of playing tennis once per week. Failure to achieve this may not be because you don’t want to play tennis, but because of logistical issues like finding a court. When you find yourself not achieving a goal, try to get a better sense of what’s getting in your way. Is there anything you could be doing differently to make it easier to accomplish this goal? These types of questions can be part of the therapeutic process, and a therapist can work with you to problem solve the practical obstacles and identify solutions to achieve your goals.

Make Your Goals Non-negotiable

When we don’t put something down in writing (in pen), we are more likely to blow it off—especially when it’s something that doesn’t come with more tangible consequences (deadlines for work, due dates for school assignments, etc). Let’s take the goal of spending one hour a week doing a self-care activity like journaling or reading for leisure. For many of us, our needs and wants tend to have the lowest priority, and so when schedules get busy, our self-care is the first to be sacrificed. Try putting specific times in your schedule for activities related to your goals and make them non-negotiable. You can also find ways to remind yourself with phone alerts or post-it notes in strategic places.

Use Coping Statements

coping-statements-motivational-therapy-therapists-new-york-02

Many people suggest reading motivational statements such as “just do it!” and “no pain no gain!” to encourage us to follow through on our goals. Often, these platitudes seem empty and uninspiring (like those cheesy posters we used to have in elementary school). Instead, try coming up with your own personalized coping statements.

So what are coping statements? They are different from overly positive “just do it” messages because they incorporate and acknowledge what makes a task difficult. If we skip acknowledging why something is hard, the statement won’t ring true. The most important thing about a good coping statement is that you actually believe it!

Let’s practice!

Take the goal of learning a new language with the help of an app like Duolingo. Some examples of effective coping statements may be:

• “I’m already exhausted from work, but I know I’ll feel proud of myself when I finish one lesson and I’m closer to reaching my goal of learning to speak Spanish.”

• “Learning a new language is hard and it seems like I’m never going to get better at it. But every day I practice I will be getting better.”

Now What?

reach-goals-help-therapist-psychotherapy-brooklyn-ny-03So what do you actually do with these brilliant coping statements? You find some way to internalize these statements so you can draw upon them when you’re wavering over whether or not to take action towards your goals. How you do this is entirely up to you. Some clients write their coping statements on a notecard and review them several times per day, some have them in their phones and set reminders to read them, and others like to record their statements and listen to them when they feel like giving up.

Reach Your Goals

So what are some of your goals and what’s standing in the way? With the support of a therapist, you can work to overcome the obstacles that stand in the way of you reaching your full potential.

If you are considering psychotherapy for motivation, speak with one of our experts today:

(718) 260-6462

Do You Need a Psychotherapist for Trauma?

psychotherapist-for-trauma-nyc-brooklyn-01Do you need a psychotherapist for trauma? When you think of the word “trauma,” what automatically comes to mind? Maybe it’s a veteran who just returned from war, a survivor of domestic violence, or an abused child. Most people associate the word “trauma” with life-threatening events like war or a natural disaster, but what if that definition of trauma is too narrow? Today the definition of trauma is expanding and becoming more individualized. What may be traumatic for one person may not be traumatic for another person. This is influenced by family of origin, life experiences, and beliefs. Everyone’s definition of trauma is valid and every trauma is important and worthy of healing.

What is Trauma?

Often trauma is invisible so it’s hard for others to understand, and even for individuals to admit the trauma to themselves. For example, maybe you don’t have physical bruises, but systematic invalidation from a partner has left you emotionally wounded. Working on this interpersonal trauma is just as important as healing from a more “traditional” trauma.

Based on our environment growing up and beliefs we’ve learned, we may be left with a negative view of ourselves, relationships, and the world. On the outside, everything might seem fine, but inwardly these beliefs can have a negative impact on our relationships, confidence, professional success, and overall happiness.

Symptoms

trauma-symptoms-do-need-nyc-therapist--specialists-02So how do you know if you’re dealing with trauma to begin with? There is a spectrum of responses to trauma ranging from an acute stress reaction to full on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Responses to trauma can be brief, time-limited, or chronic. Everyone is different. However, some of the common signs include experiencing at least one of the following intrusive symptoms associated with a traumatic event:

  • Involuntarily reliving the traumatic experience which can include having nightmares or flashbacks.
  • Avoiding certain situations that remind you of the trauma.
  • Changes in beliefs and feelings about yourself and others.
  • Hyper-vigilance – always feeling on guard and like something terrible will happen even when you’re not in danger.
  • Somatic symptoms like insomnia, loss of appetite, panic attacks, heart palpitations, etc.
  • Difficulties with emotional regulation. PTSD is often misdiagnosed as a mood disorder like depression or anxiety.
  • Negative self-image and thoughts about themselves. Those who have experienced trauma often blame themselves. Themes of guilt, shame, and responsibility can be prevalent.

Therapeutic Approaches

emdr-for-trauma-psychotherapists-nyc-brooklrn-03The journey to healing trauma can be a long and difficult one. But with courage, resilience, and the support of a psychotherapist for trauma, it is possible. There are many therapeutic approaches and techniques that are used to recover from trauma. Some of them include:

EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) EMDR works to support clients in reprocessing distress, reintegrating information, and making more adaptive connections.

Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT): TF-CBT is a short-term, structured treatment approach that works to help individuals recover from trauma.

Attachment Theory: This includes working to explore and understand interpersonal and relational traumas.

We Can Help

At Cobb Psychotherapy we don’t have a one-size-fits-all definition of trauma. We have therapists who specialize in trauma and are trained in EMDR, Trauma-focused CT, and Attachment Theory.

Contact us to learn more or to schedule a free fifteen-minute phone consult:

(718) 260-6462

Utilizing CBT Therapy for Panic Attacks

cbt-therapist-for-panic-attackes-new-york-nyc-brooklyn-best-01Could you benefit from CBT therapy for panic attacks? Anxiety is an emotion that we all need as human beings. A healthy amount of anxiety is necessary in order to motivate and protect ourselves. However, sometimes our anxiety passes a point where it is no longer helpful. For example, it may become excessive worry, make us freeze up in social situations, lead us to engage in compulsive behavior, obsess over fears, or become panic attacks.

What are Panic Attacks

Panic attacks are sudden episodes of intense fear that include, but are not limited to physical symptoms such as a racing heartbeat, sweating, shaking, feelings of breathlessness, nausea, stomach upset, crying, and dissociating from one’s body. So what causes them? One major cause of panic is a buildup of emotion. When someone’s main coping mechanism is to avoid feelings, it can often lead to panic attacks.

Try to think about it with this analogy. Imagine filling up a mug with delicious hot coffee. The coffee is hot, so you wait for it to cool down. Then you take small sips and savor each one. When you’ve finished, you take the cup to the sink, wash it, dry it, and place it in the cabinet until tomorrow. Sounds pretty standard, right? Now imagine you were the coffee cup. The hot coffee is the intense emotion, waiting for it to cool and drinking the coffee slowly is the process of emotional regulation, washing the mug is an act of self-care, and having it in the cabinet is rest.

Anxiety

anxiety-panic-attack-info-top-nyc-brooklyn-psychotherapists-02In order to manage anxiety we have to regulate emotions on a daily basis in a healthy way, just like the coffee routine described above. Otherwise, we will become overloaded and possibly panic — just like if you kept pouring hot coffee in the mug and let it overflow everywhere. We must learn tools to slow down our thinking, get in tune with our emotions, and take care of ourselves effectively. Remember, a cup can only hold so much.

Anyone can have a panic attack at any point in their life. They’re quite common and can feel scary, especially if you’ve never had one before. So what do you do if you have a panic attack or experience chronic panic? We’re big supporters of utilizing all inclusive supports. Educate yourself on panic, get a physical exam to rule out health concerns, meet with a psychiatrist to assess for any medication needs, enlist the support of love ones, and meet with a CBT for panic attacks Therapist.

So what is a CBT therapist?

CBT or cognitive behavioral therapy is a type of therapy that is effective in treating panic attacks. CBT teaches clients how to build self-awareness and insight into their thought patterns and reframe thoughts and beliefs that interfere with healthy emotional regulation and relationships. Insight is power, and changing your self talk will be your best tool for managing anxiety. After all, panic attacks are accompanied by negative automatic thoughts. Therefore, learning to effectively use different thoughts is a great strategy to be able to de-escalate symptoms.

Learn CBT Skills

cognitive-behavioral-therapy-panic-attacks-specialists-03One example of a CBT skill is using a thought record. Your therapist can help you identify your triggers for panic, the emotions that arise during panic, negative automatic thought patterns, ways to categorize these patterns, evidence for the thoughts being both true and untrue, and alternative thoughts to practice soothing the anxiety. A thought record is just one example of an exercise you can do with a CBT therapist in order to learn concrete strategies to manage anxiety and panic.

Chances are that if you are open willing to learn new coping skills, you can minimize your panic and anxiety symptoms and start to feel more confident in your ability to manage emotions.

For more information about the psychotherapy modalities we use visit our main website: www.CobbPsychotherapy.com/approaches

To schedule an appointment:

Call: (718) 260-6462

Contact Page: www.CobbPsychotherapy.com/contact

 

How to Find the Best Therapist For YOU

how-choose-best-therapist-ny-nyc-brooklyn-01Finding the best therapist can be daunting. The decision to begin (or return to) therapy may already have been a challenging step, and now you are faced with the task of selecting the right therapist. We’re hoping we can lend a helping hand.

We always ask new clients if they’ve been in therapy before, and if so, we like to know what their experiences were like. Unfortunately, for some clients, an experience with the wrong therapist led them to stop therapy for a number of years. So why do people have bad experiences in therapy, and what can we do to avoid this? Here are some tips to consider as you embark on your journey to begin or revisit therapy:

Compatibility

top-psychotherapists-new-york-how-choose-info-02

There is no cookie cutter version of a best therapist — we vary in countless ways. Not every therapist and their style is going to be right for every person, so it is important to both check in with your needs, as well as do some research of what is out there. Are you looking to find support with coping with anxiety, addressing issues with communication in relationships, or maintaining recovery from an eating disorder? Finding a therapist who’s specialities meet your needs is important. Additionally, finding the right therapeutic approach is a factor to consider. Do you want a therapist who is active and goal-oriented, or someone who is going to do a deep dive into your history? There are a lot of different therapeutic modalities, but doing a bit of research of what’s out there can go a long way in ensuring that you find the best fit therapist.

Be Okay With Walking Away

While challenging resistance and working through the discomfort of self-exploration is part of the therapeutic process, we also have to trust our intuition if we feel that the rapport and connection with the therapist is off. We often hear that people stay in therapeutic situations that don’t work for them because they feel bad “breaking up with their therapists.” We encourage clients to regularly give feedback and communicate when they feel that something isn’t working for them. While this may lead to positive change and growth with the therapist you are working with, it may also allow you to move on and work with someone who is a better fit.

Give Yourself Permission to Shop Around

new-york-psychotherapists-how-find-best-03

As nice as it would be to guarantee that you find the right fit on your first try, you may have to shop around until you feel like you’ve found somebody you’re truly comfortable with. When you’re picking a therapist, trust your gut. Maybe you don’t feel comfortable talking to them, or you don’t feel that they can help you accomplish your goals. If you get the sense that they aren’t the right fit, just tell them. Even if it’s scary, you’ll likely find that the therapist is more understanding than you think.

Ask for Referrals/Do Some Research

Another way to find a good therapist is to ask a friend or family member for a personal referral to somebody that was helpful to them. Sites like Psychology Today also have great resources to find quality therapists. There are plenty of therapists out there so don’t settle.

At Cobb Psychotherapy, we take pride in our ethical and professional psychotherapy services. Call one of our expert therapists today and receive a no obligation consultation.

Call Today: (718) 260-6462

Why You Should Consider Online Therapy

best-online-therapy-psychotherapists-nyc-brooklyn-01Is online therapy as effective as traditional therapy? For many of us, the idea of going through a whole day without access to our smartphones and the internet may seem unimaginable. Just think about the panic that sets in when you’re driving and realize you have no signal (no Google Maps!) Or the frustration you feel when you can’t reach friends and family because of a wifi dead zone.

We embrace the benefits of technology in various areas of our lives, so why not try it with therapy? In online therapy, the therapeutic work is the same but it takes place virtually instead of in person in an office. Unsure about it? Here are some reasons why online therapy might be for you:

Convenience of Online Therapy

save-time-no-trael-with-online-therapy-best-brooklyn-nyc-ny-03With online therapy, you have the option of doing it anywhere. This means instead of squeezing onto the crowded subway at rush hour to see your therapist you could be sitting on your couch, in your PJs, sipping coffee. If the time commitment has been an obstacle for attending therapy in the past, online therapy cuts out the commute time.

Flexibility

To get the maximum benefit out of therapy, it’s important to see your therapist regularly. However, for many, consistently attending therapy is difficult. This may be due to frequent travel or an inconsistent work schedule. With online therapy, this problem is solved. Online therapy gives you flexibility because you don’t have to go into your therapist’s office each time and you have the option to have early morning, late night, and weekend appointments.

Privacy

If you feel uncomfortable going into a therapist’s office, online therapy is a great solution. Maybe it’s your first time trying therapy, or you’re nervous about what others might think. Online therapy is a great way to feel safe and comfortable during the therapy process. At Cobb Psychotherapy we use 100% HIPAA compliant video software.

Financial Benefits

Being able to carve out time during your day to attend a session isn’t the only obstacle—there are also financial barriers to consider. We often forget about the additional costs to therapy outside of the actual session fee. Online therapy allows you to save money on travel (subway fare or parking) as well as any other costs, such as daycare, that you need to consider when meeting with a therapist in person.

Accessibility to Online Therapy

top-online-psychotherapy-new-york-info-benefits-02Many people have circumstances that make it hard to get to an in-person appointment. Perhaps you’re a parent and it’s hard to find childcare, or difficulties with mobility make attending a session in person challenging. These things don’t have to be a barrier to getting the therapy you need. It’s as easy as sitting down in front of your computer.

Access to Quality Therapists

If you live in a remote area or small town there may be a shortage of qualified therapists who meet your therapeutic needs. Online therapy is a great solution because it opens up the possibility of finding a therapist who is the right fit.

If you decide to try online therapy our team will support you in setting up both your tech and your space in order to have a seamless experience. All you need is internet access and a computer with a webcam.

Contact us to learn more or to set up a free 15-minute phone consult.

(718) 260-6462

For more information, visit our main website: www.CobbPsychotherapy.com

How Do You Find the Best Psychotherapist in NYC or Brooklyn?

hot-find-best-psychotherapists-manhattan-brooklyn-01How do you find the best psychotherapist in NYC or Brooklyn? Finding a psychotherapist that meets your needs can be daunting. The decision to begin (or return to) therapy may already have been a challenging step, and now you are faced with the task of selecting the right therapist. We’re hoping we can lend a helping hand.

We always ask new clients if they’ve been in therapy before, and if so, we like to know what their experiences were like. Unfortunately, for some clients, an experience with the wrong therapist led them to stop therapy for a number of years. So why do people have bad experiences in therapy, and what can we do to avoid this? Here are some tips to consider as you embark on your journey to begin or revisit therapy:

Compatibility

top-nyc-pschotherapists-brooklyn-nyc-02There is no cookie cutter version of a therapist — we vary in countless ways. Not every therapist and their style is going to be right for every person, so it is important to both check in with your needs, as well as do some research of what is out there. Are you looking to find support with coping with anxiety, addressing issues with communication in relationships, or maintaining recovery from an eating disorder? Finding a therapist who’s specialities meet your needs is important. Additionally, finding the right therapeutic approach is a factor to consider. Do you want a therapist who is active and goal-oriented, or someone who is going to do a deep dive into your history? There are a lot of different therapeutic modalities, but doing a bit of research of what’s out there can go a long way in ensuring that you find the best fit therapist.

Be Okay With Walking Away

While challenging resistance and working through the discomfort of self-exploration is part of the therapeutic process, we also have to trust our intuition if we feel that the rapport and connection with the therapist is off. We often hear that people stay in therapeutic situations that don’t work for them because they feel bad “breaking up with their therapists.” We encourage clients to regularly give feedback and communicate when they feel that something isn’t working for them. While this may lead to positive change and growth with the therapist you are working with, it may also allow you to move on and work with someone who is a better fit.

Give Yourself Permission to Shop Around

top-nyc-psychotherapists-individual-group-couples-specialists-03As nice as it would be to guarantee that you find the right fit on your first try, you may have to shop around until you feel like you’ve found somebody you’re truly comfortable with.  When you’re picking a therapist, trust your gut. Maybe you don’t feel comfortable talking to them, or you don’t feel that they can help you accomplish your goals. If you get the sense that they aren’t the right fit, just tell them. Even if it’s scary, you’ll likely find that the therapist is more understanding than you think.

Ask for Referrals and Do Some Research

Another way to find a good therapist is to ask a friend or family member for a personal referral to somebody that was helpful to them. Sites like Psychology Today also have great resources to find quality therapists. There are plenty of therapists out there so don’t settle.

If you are seeking the best psychotherapy services in the NYC area, call Cobb Psychotherapy LCSW today at 718-260-6462 to schedule an appointment with one of our highly trained professional therapists.

Whether you are seeking individual therapy, couples therapy, group therapy or online therapy,  Cobb Psychotherapy LCSW will help you achieve your therapy goals.

For more information, visit our main website: www.CobbPsychotherapy.com

Psychotherapy

top-nyc-psychotherapists-psychotherapy-informationPsychotherapy is the use of psychological methods, particularly when based on regular personal interaction, to help a person change behavior and overcome problems in desired ways. Psychotherapy aims to improve an individual’s well-being and mental health, to resolve or mitigate troublesome behaviors, beliefs, compulsions, thoughts, or emotions, and to improve relationships and social skills. Certain psychotherapies are considered evidence-based for treating some diagnosed mental disorders. Others have been criticized as pseudoscience.

There are over a thousand different psychotherapy techniques, some being minor variations, while others are based on very different conceptions of psychology, ethics (how to live), or techniques. Most involve one-to-one sessions, between client and therapist, but some are conducted with groupsincluding families. Psychotherapists may be mental health professionals such as psychiatrists, psychologists, clinical social workers, marriage and family therapists, or professional counselors. Psychotherapists may also come from a variety of other backgrounds, and depending on the jurisdiction may be legally regulated, voluntarily regulated or unregulated (and the term itself may be protected or not).

Overview

basic-psychotherapy-info-wiki-02There are hundreds of psychotherapy approaches or schools of thought. By 1980 there were more than 250; by 1996 more than 450; and at the start of the 21st century there were over a thousand different named psychotherapies—some being minor variations while others are based on very different conceptions of psychology, ethics (how to live) or technique. In practice therapy is often not of one pure type but draws from a number of perspectives and schools—known as an integrative or eclectic approach. The importance of the therapeutic relationship, also known as therapeutic alliance, between client and therapist is often regarded as crucial to psychotherapy. Common factors theory addresses this and other core aspects thought to be responsible for effective psychotherapy. Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), a Viennese neurologist who studied with Charcot in 1885, is often considered the father of modern psychotherapy. His methods included analyzing dreams for important insights that lay out of awareness of the dreamer. Other major elements of his methods, which changed throughout the years, included identification of childhood sexuality, the role of anxiety as a manifestation of inner conflict, the differentiation of parts of the psyche (id, ego, superego), transference and countertransference (the patient’s projections onto the therapist, and the therapist’s emotional responses to that). Some of his concepts were too broad to be amenable to empirical testing and invalidation, and he was critiqued for this by Jaspers. Numerous major figures elaborated and refined Freud’s therapeutic techniques including Melanie Klein, Donald Winnicott, and others. Since the 1960s, however, the use of Freudian-based analysis for the treatment of mental disorders has declined substantially. Different types of psychotherapy have been created along with the advent of clinical trials to test them scientifically. These incorporate subjective treatments (after Beck), behavioral treatments (after Skinner and Wolpe) and additional time-constrained and centered structures, for example, interpersonal psychotherapy. In youth issue and in schizophrenia, the systems of family treatment hold esteem. A portion of the thoughts emerging from therapy are presently pervasive and some are a piece of the armamentarium of ordinary clinical practice. They are not just medications, they additionally help to understand complex conduct.

Therapy may address specific forms of diagnosable mental illness, or everyday problems in managing or maintaining interpersonal relationships or meeting personal goals. A course of therapy may happen before, during or after pharmacotherapy (e.g. taking psychiatric medication).

Psychotherapies are categorized in several different ways. A distinction can be made between those based on a medical model and those based on a humanistic model. In the medical model the client is seen as unwell and the therapist employs their skill to help the client back to health. The extensive use of the DSM-IV, the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders in the United States, is an example of a medically exclusive model. The humanistic or non-medical model in contrast strives to depathologise the human condition. The therapist attempts to create a relational environment conducive to experiential learning and help build the client’s confidence in their own natural process resulting in a deeper understanding of themselves. The therapist may see themselves as a facilitator/helper.

psychotherapy-history-origins-info-wiki-03Another distinction is between individual one-to-one therapy sessions, and group psychotherapy, including couples therapy and family therapy.

Therapies are sometimes classified according to their duration; a small number of sessions over a few weeks or months may be classified as brief therapy (or short-term therapy), others where regular sessions take place for years may be classified as long-term.

Some practitioners distinguish between more “uncovering” (or “depth“) approaches and more “supportive” psychotherapy. Uncovering psychotherapy emphasizes facilitating the client’s insight into the roots of their difficulties. The best-known example is classical psychoanalysis. Supportive psychotherapy by contrast stresses strengthening the client’s coping mechanisms and often providing encouragement and advice, as well as reality-testing and limit-setting where necessary. Depending on the client’s issues and situation, a more supportive or more uncovering approach may be optimal.

Most forms of psychotherapy use spoken conversation. Some also use various other forms of communication such as the written word, artworkdramanarrative story or music. Psychotherapy with children and their parents often involves play, dramatization (i.e. role-play), and drawing, with a co-constructed narrative from these non-verbal and displaced modes of interacting.

There are also different formats for delivering some therapies, as well as the usual face to face: for example via telephone or via online interaction. There have also been developments in computer-assisted therapy, such as virtual reality therapy for behavioral exposure, multimedia programs to each cognitive techniques, and handheld devices for improved monitoring or putting ideas into practice.

 

Above information is an excerpt from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychotherapy